• Kahneman and Thaler – Should I Go in the Water?

    I’ve often used the illustration of a shark attack to explain the Availability Bias (Kahneman and Tversky) – in a nutshell, the mental illusion that memorable events are more likely than their their statistical rarity predicts. Although shark attacks are vivid, make incredible headlines, are gruesome, and therefore are memorable, we are much more likely to die from the mundane – a fall, lighting strike, pig attack, and so on. Therefore, rationally speaking, imagery from the Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week” should not stop us from enjoying the waves.

    This Saturday, I’m heading to the same NC beaches that boast no less than 8 (!!) shark attacks in the past several weeks – the highest number in over 80 years. What is happening? Are we under siege? According to some expert reports, these shark attacks are “extraordinary,” represent “incredible odds” and a “perfect storm”.

    And so I ask Drs. Kahneman and Thaler – what would you do?

    Keep Reading
  • A Mega-Multitasker’s Summer Update

    By Marjorie Stiegler on August 17, 2015 in Uncategorized
    0
    0

    In academic medicine, July is a bit like New Year’s Eve, so it is the time I evaluate, celebrate, and strategize. Here’s a quick update about what’s been going on, and what’s coming up.

    There is just so much to be excited about!

    Keep Reading
  • Poll Question of the Day – Tweeting Academic Conference Slides

    By Marjorie Stiegler on May 13, 2015 in Leadership, Social Media
    7
    0

    Some consider their slides intellectual property, while others are delighted to have additional amplification of their message. Audience members and speakers alike sometimes find photography and devices distracting. What do you think?

    Keep Reading
  • Try This Self-Imposed Discomfort for Big Results

    By Marjorie Stiegler on May 4, 2015 in Leadership
    0
    0

    Sometimes it feels like you’re in the middle of the “next big thing” – energy is high, opportunities are plenty, and you are burning the candle at both ends. While you may be making great strides towards your goals during these times, you might be surprised to know that research has shown a benefit to curbing your enthusiasm. Slow and steady really does win the race. Here’s why…

    Keep Reading
  • Idiot or Jerk? Racing to the Top of Ladder of Inference

    My husband and I have this recurring debate whenever we’re driving and someone cuts us off or does something dangerous: is that guy an idiot, or is that guy a jerk?

    Keep Reading
  • Teamwork in Medicine – What’s the Downside?

    Teamwork has long been promoted as the panacea to medical errors and suboptimal care processes in medicine. For about two decades now, healthcare institutions have invested heavily in team training of various sorts, with a particular emphasis on communication and “speaking up” for patient safety. As well, there is a current trend towards “flattening the hierarchy” – reducing the preconceived levels of rank, authority, and power that exist explicitly or implied, and are typically informed by discipline, age or seniority, educational background, and title.

    Keep Reading
  • Viral Photo of ER Doc Weeping After Losing 19 Year Old

    An ER doc cries after losing a 19 year old patient. The internet responds:

    “And in the end, when the life went out of him and my hands could work no more, I left from that place into the night and wept – for myself, for life, for the tragedy of death’s coming. Then I rose, and walking back to the suffering-house forgot again my own wounds for the sake of healing theirs.”

    “Healthcare is a life of fighting, defending yourself, sacrificing yourself, working weekends, missing holidays, and sometimes things like losing a patient makes you want to throw up your hands and say ‘ I’m out.’ But you can’t.”

    Keep Reading

Google+